Develop your skills

Whatever your planned activity for the day, be honest with yourself about you and your companions’ knowledge, fitness and ability. We all like to kid ourselves that we are fitter, or indeed more capable than we are but in this instance it pays to be honest.

Know where you are going
Carry a map/chart and compass and know how to use them.

Every year thousands of people end up calling for help because they are lost and/or tired. Nowadays paper maps may seem unnecessary but they are light to carry and their batteries don’t run out of charge! For simple guides to map reading and using a compass check out these OS Beginner’s Guides.

Know your limits

If the weather, ground conditions or route are beyond your capabilities or equipment, consider your options – it’s OK to choose a more suitable route or to turn back. Remember to allow enough time for the least able member of your group.  Check out National Park and AONB websites for walking routes for all abilities

Respect the water

If you are on the beach or walking along the coast;

  • Don’t get cut off by the tides – check tide times
  • Where possible choose a lifeguarded beach and swim between the red and yellow flags
  • Don’t jump into pools unless you know there are no hazards beneath the water
  • If you are caught in a rip current, don’t try to swim against it. If you can, stand and wade, don’t swim.  If you can’t stand, swim parallel to the shore, raise your hand and shout for help

If you are heading out on the water;

  • Check the anticipated currents and tidal predictions for your trip and make sure they fit with what you’re planning to do
  • Look after your boat; know how to fix common problems and how to carry out basic maintenance
  • Plan your passage – check if there are any hazards or navigational risks you should avoid
  • Make sure that everyone on board, or in your group, knows where the safety equipment is stowed and how to use it
  • Make a habit of clipping onto suitable points around the boat at night, when you are alone on deck or in rough conditions
  • In a motorised craft? If it has a kill cord use it

Plan for the least able member of your group

For example, if reaching the summit is going to be a challenge then switch to a lower level walk that you can all enjoy and achieve comfortably. Check out National Park and AONB websites for walking routes for all abilities.

If you’re doing something new or going somewhere new…
why not go with a qualified guide/instructor or sign up for some training?

There are lots of enthusiastic and knowledgable guides and instructors to be found on VisitWales.com or you can follow the links below for specific activity courses, they can take your adventure to a whole new level, but in a good way!

Hill walking/Mountaineering
Canoeing
Mountain biking
Sailing, Windsurfing and Powerboating
Stand Up Paddleboarding (SUP)

Float to Live…
cold water shock passes in less than 2 minutes, so relax and float on your back until you can control your breathing.

You may not have intended to take a dip but you could suffer cold water shock if you slip, trip or fall into the sea, lake or river. Follow this simple advice to allow the effects of cold water shock to pass, your breathing to come under control and give you the best chance to shout for help and find something to help you float or swim to safety. You will be glad you packed some spare warm, dry clothing!

First aid saves lives….
and knowing what to do in an emergency can make all the difference.

First aid is a simple skill, but it has an incredible impact. Everyone should get the opportunity to learn it.

Download a pocket sized guide to Essential First Aid
Sign up for first aid training England / Wales

BE ADVENTURESMART

Think about Gear

You don’t need the latest high tech, high performance, painfully expensive jacket to be AdventureSmart.  The trick is putting a little bit of thought into what conditions you might meet and packing a bag with just enough to ensure you can cope with whatever the day may bring.

Watch the Weather

We are renowned for being a bit obsessed with the weather in the UK, which makes it surprising that people frequently don’t pay enough attention to how it might affect their days adventure.
Whatever your activity being prepared for the weather can make a big difference as to how you feel at the end of the day.

Develop your skills

Whatever your planned activity for the day, be honest with yourself about you and your companions’ knowledge, fitness and ability. We all like to kid ourselves that we are fitter, or indeed more capable than we are but in this instance it pays to be honest.

Know how and when to get help

Accidents can happen to anyone however adventure smart you are, so whatever your activity make sure you carry an appropriate means of calling for help should you need to.